Posted by: coastlinesproject | October 20, 2014

West in similar atmospheric pattern as during the 1934 Dust Bowl.

http://www.dumb-out.net/similar-atmospheric-patterns-seem-cause-1934-drought-recent-drought-presently-affecting-state/9364

Read more in; Islands in the Storm, Storm Surge; A Coastal Village Battles the Atlantic, Beach Wars; 10,000 Years on a Barrier Beach. See Strawberry Hill, UPNE, and Schiffer book tabs at the top of this page.

 

Posted by: coastlinesproject | October 19, 2014

Gonzalo aims for Greenland, Iceland and Great Britain.

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/refresh/graphics_at3+shtml/083243.shtml?tswind120#contents

Read more in; Islands in the Storm, Storm Surge; A Coastal Village Battles the Atlantic, Beach Wars; 10,000 Years on a Barrier Beach. See Strawberry Hill, UPNE, and Schiffer book tabs at the top of this page.

 

Posted by: coastlinesproject | October 18, 2014

Bermuda faces extensive damage from Gonzalo.

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/bermuda-faces-extensive-damage-hurricane-gonzalo-n228751

 

Read more in; Islands in the Storm, Storm Surge; A Coastal Village Battles the Atlantic, Beach Wars; 10,000 Years on a Barrier Beach. See Strawberry Hill, UPNE, and Schiffer book tabs at the top of this page.

 

Posted by: coastlinesproject | October 18, 2014

Hibernia oil rigs threatened by Gonzalo.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/hurricane-gonzalo-waves-wind-to-hit-offshore-at-grand-banks-1.2804100

Posted by: coastlinesproject | October 18, 2014

Bermuda gets Gonzoed.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/ap/article-2797401/Powerful-Hurricane-Gonzalo-approaching-Bermuda.html

 

Read more in; Islands in the Storm, Storm Surge; A Coastal Village Battles the Atlantic, Beach Wars; 10,000 Years on a Barrier Beach. See Strawberry Hill, UPNE, and Schiffer book tabs at the top of this page.

 

 

http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/dangerous-hurricane-gonzalo-barrels-toward-bermuda-n227941

 

 

Posted by: coastlinesproject | October 16, 2014

Bermuda threatening by Category 4 hurricane Gonzalo.

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/refresh/graphics_at3+shtml/115722.shtml?tswind120#contents

 

Read more in; Islands in the Storm, Storm Surge; A Coastal Village Battles the Atlantic, Beach Wars; 10,000 Years on a Barrier Beach. See Strawberry Hill, UPNE, and Schiffer book tabs at the top of this page.

 

 

 

Posted by: coastlinesproject | October 15, 2014

Bermuda threatened by second hurricane Gonzalo.

NewsALERT™
AIR WORLDWIDE

Hurricane Gonzalo Skirts Caribbean Islands, Threatens Bermuda
Location: 20.3°N, 65.2°W (11:00 AM AST, Tuesday, October 14)
Speed: NW at 13 mph
Minimum pressure: 973 mb
Maximum sustained wind: 110 mph
Possible landfall: Tracking toward Bermuda, with potential landfall late in the week
Hurricane warnings: Anguilla, British Virgin Islands, and St. Martin
Hurricane watches: Culebra, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Vieques
Tropical storm warnings: Antigua, Barbuda, Culebra, Montserrat, Nevis, Puerto Rico, Saba, St. Barthelemy, St. Eustatius, St. Kitts, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Vieques
Reported damage: Torn roofs, knocked-down trees, power outages, primarily on Antigua
Webinar icon
Tropical Storm Gonzalo passed through the eastern Caribbean on a northwest course, further east than initially forecast, delivering heavy wind and rain to Antigua and other close-by islands. Near St. Martin, Gonzalo achieved hurricane-speed winds and continued to strengthen—more quickly than forecast. Now a Category 2 storm with 110 mph maximum sustained winds and a minimum pressure of 973 mb, Gonzalo is expected to take a turn to the northeast by early Thursday and set a course for Bermuda. Hurricane Gonzalo is not expected to reach the U.S. mainland.

Odelle current position
Satellite image of Hurricane Gonzalo late Monday, October 13. (Source: NOAA)

Many warnings and watches have been issued for Gonzalo, including hurricane warnings for Anguilla, the British Virgin Islands, and St. Martin; hurricane watches for Culebra, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Vieques; and tropical storm warnings for Antigua, Barbuda, Culebra, Montserrat, Nevis, Puerto Rico, Saba, St. Barthelemy, St. Eustatius, St. Kitts, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Vieques.

Meteorological Summary and Forecast
Tropical Storm Gonzalo formed over the weekend, just east of the Antilles. As a tropical storm, Gonzalo passed through the northern Antilles. As it moved northwest on Monday, roughly between Antigua and St. Thomas, Gonzalo reached hurricane status. Hurricane Gonzalo has continued to strengthen to a Category 2 storm on the Saffir-Simpson scale, with maximum sustained wind of 110 mph and a minimum pressure of 973 mb. The storm should experience lower wind shear and warm water on its projected track, contributing to its strength and potential for damage should it impact Bermuda.

Odelle current position
Hurricane Gonzalo five-day forecast cone, as of 11:00 a.m. EDT, October 14. (Source: NOAA)

Reported and Expected Impacts
As a tropical storm and then hurricane, Gonzalo tore roofs off structures, felled trees, and knocked out power as it passed through the eastern Caribbean, primarily impacting Antigua. Heavy rain from the storm could result in mudslides, particularly in mountainous areas, as well as flash flooding. Gonzalo has also produced large swells, resulting in potentially dangerous surf and rip currents.

At Category 2 wind speeds, it is expected that significant damage will occur to poorly built structures. Structures that are built to the local codes and building standards are not immune from damage, but damage will likely be limited to roof covering, wall cladding, and unprotected windows. Similar damage would also be expected for larger commercial structures. While Bermuda is on track to experience Gonzalo’s significant winds, the high building standards and construction quality will help to mitigate much of the impact. Certainly cruise ship arrivals, air traffic, and other tourism activities would be affected.

Exposure at Risk
The potential for structural damage from hurricanes in the Caribbean region varies widely from moderate to high vulnerability, depending both on building codes and building code enforcement. Grenada, Haiti, Trinidad and Tobago, St. Lucia, St. Kitts and Nevis, Jamaica, and Barbados islands, for example, have low building regulation enforcement and thus higher vulnerability to hurricane wind and rain. In contrast, Bermuda (as well as the Bahamas and Puerto Rico), benefits from strong building codes and rigorous enforcement, and thus has lower vulnerability.

Reinforced concrete apartments, condominiums, and other structures often are constructed with some level of structural engineering attention, which reduces their vulnerability to moderate winds. However, unprotected windows and openings can pose a risk for possible breaches in the building’s envelope, subsequently allowing for higher wind loads on the building and allowing rain intrusion to damage contents. Structures of masonry construction, however, can exhibit varying vulnerability due to differences in building quality and adherence to building codes.

The AIR tropical cyclone team will continue to monitor Hurricane Gonzalo, as well as a developing storm in the Central Pacific, Tropical Storm Ana, which has the potential to affect Hawaii this weekend. Updates will be provided as warranted by events.

Read more in; Islands in the Storm, Storm Surge; A Coastal Village Battles the Atlantic, Beach Wars; 10,000 Years on a Barrier Beach. See Strawberry Hill, UPNE, and Schiffer book tabs at the top of this page.

 

 

 

Posted by: coastlinesproject | October 14, 2014

Bermuda cleans up in wake of Hurricane Fay.

NewsALERT™
AIR WORLDWIDE

Clean-Up Begins in Bermuda as Tropical Storm Fay Moves out into Open Ocean
Current location: 34.3°N 55.3°W
Movement: East at 26 mph
Maximum sustained winds: 65 mph
Minimum central pressure: 988 mb
Hurricane or tropical storm watches: There are no watches in effect.
Webinar icon
Current Conditions and Forecast
As of the National Hurricane Center’s 5:00 a.m. advisory, Tropical Storm Fay is moving east at a speed of 26 mph. The storm briefly reached hurricane status after impacting Bermuda over the weekend but has since weakened to a tropical storm with maximum sustained winds near 65 mph and occasional higher gusts. Fay poses no further threat to onshore properties as the storm is forecast to continue moving east through Tuesday morning followed by a turn toward the east-southeast Tuesday night. The storm is expected to gradually weaken and become an extratropical cyclone by Monday evening.

Track Map for Tropical Storm Fay
Track Map for Tropical Storm Fay (Source: National Weather Service)

Damage
Tropical storm Fay lashed Bermuda with strong tropical storm force winds early Sunday, leaving 27,000 residents without power and roads blocked with debris. Bermuda sustained a direct hit from the storm with the worst conditions occurring between 7:00 and 8:30 a.m. Sunday morning. At the time of impact, the storm had maximum sustained wind speeds of 61 mph and gusts as high as 82 mph. Fay also brought bands of heavy rain that caused flooding in parts of the island.

As the clean-up began late Sunday morning, Acting Premier Trevor G. Moniz advised residents to stay off the roads and let clean-up crews do their work. To assist with the effort, 100 soldiers were called into action. Of most pressing concern was clearing several impassable roads and restoring power. In addition, five specially-trained and equipped Immediate Response Teams (IRTs) were on stand-by to help clear roads and assist other agencies as required.

The storm caused downed trees and utility poles throughout the island. Some houses sustained roof damage and torn-off shutters, prompting some Bermuda residents to remark that the storm’s damage seemed almost hurricane-like. However, given that Bermuda has strict building code enforcement and good building practices, AIR does not expect insured losses from this storm to be significant. In the City of Hamilton, Reed Street was the focus of the clean-up efforts as the road was impassable near the junction with Court Street due to downed trees. In addition, some buildings along this street sustained major damage.

Flooded buildings and roads were sporadic throughout the island with major flooding reported at L.F. Wade International Airport’s terminal building. Though flights were delayed on Sunday, the airport’s runways remain open.

While Fay is no longer a threat to any landmasses, the AIR tropical cyclone team is monitoring the Atlantic very closely. In particular, the team is keeping a close eye on tropical storm Gonzalo, which is currently impacting the northern Leeward Islands and is forecast to pass just to the east of Puerto Rico Tuesday as either a strong tropical storm or weak hurricane. AIR will issue a NewsALERT for Gonzalo with additional information if conditions warrant it.

Track Map for Tropical Storm Gonzalo
Track Map for Tropical Storm Gonzalo (Source: National Weather Service)

Read more in; Islands in the Storm, Storm Surge; A Coastal Village Battles the Atlantic, Beach Wars; 10,000 Years on a Barrier Beach. See Strawberry Hill, UPNE, and Schiffer book tabs at the top of this page.

 

 

 

 

Posted by: coastlinesproject | October 13, 2014

36 million Americans in path of powerful storm system.

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Latest-News-Wires/2014/1013/36-million-Americans-in-path-of-powerful-storm-system

 

Read more in; Islands in the Storm, Storm Surge; A Coastal Village Battles the Atlantic, Beach Wars; 10,000 Years on a Barrier Beach. See Strawberry Hill, UPNE, and Schiffer book tabs at the top of this page.

 

 

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